Environment

A Morning at Morris Farm, with an Orientation Trip

The seven first-year students and their two leaders — Isabella “Izzy” Vakkur ’20 and Keehoon “Harry” Jung ’20 — were on Day One of their three-and-a-half day orientation trip. Their particular expedition aims to introduce students to a local farm and give them a bit of insight into this region’s agricultural sector.

Maine Coast Inspires Fellows To Write: Maya Morduch-Toubman ’18

Two Bowdoin students — Maya Morduch-Toubman ’18 and Aleksia Silverman ’19 — spent this summer exploring Maine’s coast, gathering material for writing projects that aim to capture, in different ways, a bit of what it means to live here.

Hugh Cipparone ’19: Optimism and Uncertainty about Aquaculture’s Future

When I noted during the drive that optimism seemed to be the defining characteristic of both the festival presenters and the participants, the other passengers chuckled.

Madeline Schuldt ’18 Investigates an Oyster Disease Threatening the Fishery

Not much is known about MSX, a pathogen that can cause mass mortality events in oyster populations. So when she was a student in the Bowdoin Marine Science Semester in 2015, Madeline Schuldt began to do preliminary research into the prevalence of MSX in Maine’s oysters.

Zoe Borenstein ’18 Peers Into History to Better Understand Ocean Acidification

Using clues they detect in the chemical composition of shells — which can indicate how ocean pH, salinity, and water temperatures have changed over time — they are trying to reconstruct the Gulf of Maine’s climate history.

Maine Coast Inspires Bowdoin Writing Fellows: Aleksia Silverman ’19

Two Bowdoin students — Aleksia Silverman ’19 and Maya Morduch-Toubman ’18 — spent this summer exploring Maine’s coast, gathering material for writing projects that aim to capture, in different ways, a bit of what it means to live here. Both received Rusack Coastal Studies Fellowships from Bowdoin to pursue their writing.

A Bowdoin Investigation: Can a Maine Marsh Survive Rising Seas?

Eventually, with the data they will have collected, they will forecast whether the marsh, after thriving for approximately 5,000 years, can survive the coming acceleration of climate change.

Michael Mascia ’93 Named Board President of Global Conservation Group

Michael Mascia, the senior director of social science for the nonprofit Conservation International, has been named board president for the Society for Conservation Biology, the field’s pre-eminent professional society.