Earth and Oceanographic Science

Bowdoin’s Lavigne Named Frontiers of Science Fellow

“This kind of collaboration can shed different perspectives on scientific problems, which might lead to new ideas and approaches that wouldn’t necessarily have been thought of at a traditional conference.”

Bowdoin Students Present Research at Hawaii Ocean Conference

Three Bowdoin students have been in Hawaii this week presenting their honors and independent study research at an ocean sciences conference in Honolulu.

Bowdoin Environmental Scientists On Impact of Riverflow into the Gulf of Maine

Project studying the flow of carbon from rivers into the Gulf of Maine involves three Bowdoin faculty members.

New Augmented Reality Sandbox Mesmerizes…and Demonstrates Hydrology in Action

The tool is Bowdoin’s new augmented sandbox, which mesmerizes while it demonstrates hydrological and geological concepts, such as how water moves through land, both during floods and in droughts.

Peterman Probes Nanoscale Lead Reservoirs to Date Geological Events

Emily Peterman discovers new findings that are at the forefront of a completely new research field in nano geochronology.

A Summer of Science in Druckenmiller Hall

To give people a sense of the activity that went on in Druckenmiller throughout the summer, we’ve put together an interactive blueprint of the buildings.

Summer Jobs: Two Students Study, Protect Beavers and Whales

In about a week, Dana Bloch ’17 will depart for Rarotonga, the largest of the Cook Islands, to work for a whale research and conservation organization based there. Satya Kent ’19 has already begun working for a program that is relocating beavers in order to conserve water for lowland regions beset with drought.

Map Locates Student Summer Projects From the Cook Islands to Brunswick

When Senior Interactive Developer David Francis looks at the Bowdoin Summer 2016 map he built, he says it’s obvious the “Bowdoin bubble” is a myth. The interactive map allows students to post their summer location and a brief description of what they’re doing.

Paleontologist Describes Discovery of Supergiant Dreadnoughtus

Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara studies the largest creatures to ever walk this planet, the herbivorous sauropods. He visited Bowdoin recently to talk about his discovery of a new sauropod he found about a decade ago, the Dreadnoughtus schrani.

Indigenous People Seek Greater Role in Arctic Policy

“Indigenous groups know the region better than anyone on earth, so I think in terms of informing the kind of science that gets done in the Arctic they’re critical, also in terms of understanding how the environment’s changing and what it means for people who live there.”

Bowdoin Students Inspire 5th Graders to Explore Science

Members of the Bowdoin student organization, the Coalition for Expanding the Reach of Earth Sciences (CERES), invited two classes from Harriet Beecher Stowe Elementary School to a science fair last Friday.

Roux Family Gift to Transform Study of the Environment

A new center for the study of the environment will bring faculty from many academic disciplines together to encourage collaboration and creativity in the teaching and scholarship of the environment and further strengthen Bowdoin’s position as a preeminent institution in this area of study.

New Electron Microscope at Bowdoin Opens Up Research Possibilities

The new electron scanning microscope, which was purchased with a grant from the National Science Foundation, replaces an older one bought in 1999, which was growing less reliable as the years wore on. The new microscope not only can do what the old one did more quickly, it also has additional capabilities.

Mind Mapping: How to Adapt to Climate Change in the Gulf of Maine

Ocean scientist Nick Record, from the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Boothbay, held a public lecture December 2, 2015, at Adams Hall at the invitation of students from the Earth and Oceanographic Science Department. Record, who was a visiting assistant professor during the 2012-2013 academic year, talked about ways to adapt to the changing […]

Hannah Miller ’17 Talks Climate Change on ‘The CBS Evening News’

Hannah Miller ’17, studying the retreat of glaciers in Norway, talks about the science of climate change on ‘The CBS Evening News.’

Hot Topic: Professor Rachel Beane Studies Supervolcanoes

By studying micron-millimeter sized slices of fist-sized rocks collected from the earth’s surface, Professor of Earth and Oceanographic Science Rachel Beane can discern what has been happening miles below ground, in the depths of supervolcanoes. Her investigation of volcanic rocks is pushing forward our understanding of these enormous volcanoes, and could lead one day to better prediction models for their eruptions.

Cement and Landscapes: Two Art Students Show Their Summer’s Work

Two students opened exhibitions in the Edwards Center for Art and Dance last week to display works from independent art projects they pursued during the summer.

Prof. LaVigne and Students Decipher How Past Oceans Responded to Climate Change

Assistant Professor of Earth and Oceanographic Science Michèle LaVigne has a National Science Foundation grant to research deep-sea bamboo corals and what they can tell us about the connections between the ocean depths and climate.

Karina Graeter ’14 Publishes Research in Mineralogy Journal

Karina Graeter, who graduated in 2014, is the lead author of an article published in this month’s issue of the journal American Mineralogist.

Repairing the ‘Leaky Pipeline’ of Women in STEM: Clare Boothe Luce Fellows Discuss Their Research

Megan Maher ’16 and Meg Freiberger ’16 are this year’s recipients of the Clare Boothe Luce Fellowship, which is targeted at women doing research in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math.