Biology Department

For First-Years with a Scientific Orientation, Bowdoin Offers Crash Course

The Bowdoin Science Experience is designed to, in just three and a half days, “give [incoming students] a crash course in how this place works,” chemistry lecturer Michael Danahy explained. He oversees the program, which is one of the orientation trip options students can select to kick off their Bowdoin education.

Bowdoin Instructor Takes on ‘Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell Me!’ Listener Limerick Challenge (NPR)

Shana Stewart Deeds, a laboratory Instructor in biology and environmental studies, took part in the show’s Listener Limerick Challenge,” in which she was asked to complete three rhymes dealing with some of the more unusual stories in the news recently. Topics addressed include gluten-free communion wafers and snortable chocolate.

The Last of the Heath Hens: Special Collections Receives Grant to Preserve 1930s Ornithological Research

It’s full circle moment for Edward Minot, the interim director of the Bowdoin Scientific Station on Kent Island. Films documenting ornithological research done in the 1930s by his grandfather, Bowdoin professor of biology Alfred Otto Gross, Kent Island’s first director, will be digitized and preserved, thanks to a grant from the National Film Preservation Foundation.

Aidan Coyle ’17 Makes Green Crab Research Breakthrough

Scientists and conservationists have spent years trying to better understand how the crab adapts so well to new environments and continues to expand its territory. Aidan Coyle’s honors thesis is promising to add to that body of knowledge, contributing to an ongoing effort to solve a lingering crab mystery.

Goodbye, Wheelwrights, and Thank You For Everything

Colleagues and friends surprised Genie and Nat Wheelwright at the end of their final classes this semester with a couple rounds of hearty applause. Both professors are retiring from long careers at Bowdoin, where they inspired countless students to pay attention to and take care of the world around them, learn Spanish, study abroad, and undertake rigorous research projects.

Professor Horch on Why Crickets Matter (Not Least Because We Might Be Eating Them One Day)

Professor Horch’s new book, The Cricket as a Model Organism,” argues that studying crickets, which are related to locusts, could lead to new pest controls. Also, as the human population grows and puts increasing pressure on our agricultural systems, it could behoove us to have better science about this edible insect.

‘Maine Calling’ Broadcasts Bowdoin Environment Expertise to the Masses

The environment, how it’s studied at Bowdoin and how Maine is a living laboratory for that endeavor were aspects of a conversation originating on campus and shared with listeners statewide on Maine Public Radio’s interactive call-in program Maine Calling Friday, April 21, 2017.

Students Dream Up New Uses for Old Navy Base

For Katie Morse-Gagne ’19 and Andrew Blunt ’19, the 260 acres of sandplain grassland, vernal pools and stream systems, oak-pine forest and pitch pine heath barren on the former Navy base represent a bounty of possibilities for Bowdoin and the town. Since last fall, when they were in Assistant Professor of Biology Vlad Douhovnikoff’s Forest Ecology class, the […]