Arts and Culture

John Walker’s Botanical Creations Augment Museum’s ‘Why Draw?’ Show

Walker’s show, “A Painter Draws,” which opened May 18, depicts a bamboo plant he discovered in the botanical gardens of Sydney, Australia, in 2012. Walker describes the plant as having “humanness,” “character,” and movement. “It felt very much alive, and that I was talking to it with my brush and it was talking back to me,” he said.

Art—Some of it Talking—Fills Edwards Center

At this year’s Spring 2017 Visual Arts Open House, in Edwards Center for Art and Dance, digital creations — like soundscapes and videos — joined the mix of sculptures, drawings, paintings, photographs, and prints on display throughout the building. The show presents the culmination of work produced in all of this semester’s arts courses.

Vineet Shende’s New Choral Work Offers a Fresh Take on Being American

Shende says his new work is in part inspired by “the rising level of xenophobia and anti-immigrant rhetoric in our recent political discourse. Such rhetoric strikes me as being deeply un-American.”

Spring Dance Concert 2017: A Preview

This year, the much heralded annual Spring Dance Concert will feature several original pieces, including one by guest artist Rakiya Orange, who graduated from Bowdoin in 2011.

Opening April 19: Northern Clothing and Identity in the Spotlight at the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

“Threads of Change: Clothing and Identity in the North” looks at how people in the Arctic have kept themselves warm and dry in the past and how they do so today. It also examines how, over the last 100 years or so, northern people have innovated and changed some aspects of their attire, while also retaining and wearing traditional clothes reflecting the styles of their ancestors.

Network@1800: A Digital Humanities Perspective on European Cultural History

The sympomsium Network@1800: New Directions in German and European Cultural Studies brings together twenty-two scholars from across the US, Canada, and Germany to discuss new ways of looking at European cultural history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It’s being held April 6-8, 2017, with an opening lecture April 5. With funding from Bowdoin, the Federal Republic of Germany through the German […]

Student Art Overflows Lamarche Gallery at Annual Show

Each year, a foundation set up by the former Delta Sigma/Delta Upsilon fraternity invites students to submit artwork to its wide-open art show for photos, sculptures, paintings, drawings, and mixed-media pieces.

Original Student Comedy Headed for NYC Theater

After a successful run at theater festivals last summer, a play by Maggie Seymour ’16 and senior Olivia Atwood has been picked up by the People’s Improv Theater in New York City.

Human-Animal Relationship Inspires Printmaker and Visiting Artist Nancy Diessner

As a Spring 2017 Marvin Bileck Printmaking Project Visiting Artist, Diessner recently spent some time on campus, where she shared her insights with students, gave a presentation to the Bowdoin community, and exhibited her work in the Edwards Main Gallery.

Biographer Peter Logan ’75 Discusses Audubon, ‘The Greatest Naturalist’

Peter B. Logan ’75, the author of a new biography of John James Audubon (1785-1851), visited campus on Thursday and Friday to give a public talk and meet with students, staff, and faculty who are interested in printmaking and conservation.

Professor Mark Wethli’s Sculpture ‘Piper Cub’ in Rockland Gallery

A show at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art features professor Mark Wethli’s “Piper Cub,” an abstract framework of an airplane.

Rare and Vivid 2,000-year-old Mummy Mask at Bowdoin Art Museum

Bowdoin College Museum of Art will display this mask, which was created for a mummy, in its new show, AEGYPTUS: Egypt in the Greco-Roman World. The Feb. 2-July 15 exhibition explores Egypt in the time of the Greeks and Romans.

Black History Month Offers Slate of Intellectual, Musical Fare

Throughout February, Bowdoin College has lined up a series of events to celebrate Black History Month.

Bowdoin Senior Follows 63-year-old Art History Trail to Hiroshima

Bowdoin’s Michael Amano ’17 had a Curatorial Fellowship from the Bowdoin College Museum of Art to spend last summer in Japan tracking down and interviewing some of the people who had participated in a 1952-1953 art exchange between Japanese and US schoolchildren.

Students Learn Art of Curating as They Research Photography Exhibit

The exhibition, which the students themselves have researched and curated, involved close collaboration with the George J. Mitchell Department of Special Colletions & Archives.

Vineet Shende’s New Work Aims at Genuine East-West Musical Integration

Whether you’re talking music or cuisine, music professor Shende says the phrase “East meets West” is over-used, with the “Eastern” ingredient often just a superficial offering. But with his latest composition, Shende aims for true structural integration of Indian classical music with western musical tradition.

The Sacred and the Profane: Why Rome is the Ideal 21st Century Horror Movie Setting

Alison Cooper describes how Rome’s richly symbolic history makes it the perfect setting for a gory twenty-first-century horror movie.

Japanese Print Class Sees Rarely Seen Prints

Students from Alison Miller’s Japanese Print Culture seminar took a day trip to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts on Dec. 9 to see Japanese prints that are not available to wide public viewing.

To Be Seen: A Semester of Art at the Edwards Center

For the Visual Arts department’s end-of-semester open house on Dec. 9, the Edwards Center for Art and Dance was transformed into a temporary museum filled with riveting works.

Museum of Art Exhibition Examines Artists’ Fascination with the Temptation of Saint Anthony

Curator Joachim Homann says the legend of Saint Anthony, the fourth century hermit and visionary, provides “a platform for artists to come to terms with the possibilities of their art.”