Africana Studies Program

Alex Reed ’10 on Policing the Police

Alex Reed ’10 is in her final year at University of Michigan Law School. She spent last summer as a legal intern with a unit of the US Department of Justice, where she had the opportunity to work with experienced civil rights attorneys on investigations into police misconduct.

To End Black History Month, Prof. Vete-Congolo Discusses African History in the ‘New World’

For the final installment of Black History Month, Howell House hosted Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures Hanetha Vete-Congolo to discuss the representation of African history in the “so-called” New World.

For Black History Month, Professor Foster Discusses Afro-Pessimism

Associate Professor of English Guy Mark Foster recently spoke at Ladd House about a theory called Afro-Pessimism, which looks at blackness as a “social death” rather than something to be celebrated as a cultural identity. Foster’s talk was part of a slate of events happening at Bowdoin throughout February in honor of Black History Month.

Black History Month Offers Slate of Intellectual, Musical Fare

Throughout February, Bowdoin College has lined up a series of events to celebrate Black History Month.

Honoring the Legacy: Martin Luther King Jr. Speaks at Bowdoin in 1964

In the spring of 1964 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. came to Bowdoin College to speak about the civil rights movement and the importance of ending segregation and discrimination in America.

Lonnie Hackett ’14 on His Life Work—Making Kids Healthier in Zambia

It’s been three years since Lonnie Hackett ’14 received a small Bowdoin grant to launch a nonprofit in Zambia to help improve the health of young students there. In that short time, Hackett has significantly expanded the size, reach, and ambition of his organization. He is speaking at Bowdoin on Nov. 2.

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Her House, Her Novel: The Most Common Questions

Cathi Belcher, the docent of the Harriet Beecher Stowe House, has begun holding monthly “Tea with Harriet” events, inviting visitors into the newly opened home to see where Stowe wrote her famous anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Belcher has answered some of visitors’ most frequently asked questions.

The Strange Career of Jim Crow North and West

“The overall theme concerns how racial discrimination looked outside the South during much of the last century and how citizen activists addressed those problems.”