News Archive 2009-2018

‘Blossoming Tundra’ on View in Photography Show at Arctic Museum

You may think of the Arctic as a barren wasteland, but plant life abounds. As soon as the snow melts flowers begin to bloom, taking advantage of round-the-clock sunlight. In 1947 botanist and photographer Rutherford Platt captured some stunning images.

‘Enduring Connections: Contemporary Alaskan Yup’ik and Iñupiat Art’ Opening at the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

Contemporary Alaskan art has its roots in both indigenous cultural traditions and the dramatic changes Alaskan society has experienced beginning in the mid-nineteenth century.

Arctic Museum Celebrates Black History Month with Matthew Henson Button

In honor of Black History Month, the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum is featuring Matthew A. Henson, the famous African American Arctic explorer, on its February button of the month.

WCSH Explores Bowdoin’s Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

A TV crew from Portland recently checked out some of the more than 45,000 artifacts in the 50-year-old Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum — admiring the stuffed polar bears, seal-intestine clothing, fur-lined jackets, and other items on display.

Yankee Magazine Praises ‘Local Treasure’ Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum

Writing in Yankee magazine, Joe Bills described stepping “into the frigid world of Robert Peary (Class of 1877) and Donald MacMillan (Class of 1898), two of the explorers most responsible for opening the Arctic to the world.”

Arctic Museum Celebrates Its 50th with Major Inuit Art Gift

The Tolls describe their donation as “fifty Inuit graphics to celebrate the museum’s fifty years,” marking the Arctic Museum’s half century of operation.

Arctic Museum Releasing Donald MacMillan’s Historic Films of Greenland

Filmed in the 1920s, this portrayal of the Inuit performing day-to-day activities like hunting, sewing, traveling by dog sled, repairing tools and caring for children, makes these motion pictures unique.

The Story Behind the Artifact: Arctic Museum’s Seal Intestines Raincoat

The Alaskan raincoat dating from the 1860s is made from seal intestines. It was given to the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum in 2001 after being found in a barn in western Maine, where it had originally been brought by a nineteenth century whaling captain from Maine