A Year of Faculty Grants, Fellowships and Honors

Bowdoin College February 7, 2015 Campus -w- snow photo by James B Marshall

Over the past year, Bowdoin faculty from every corner of campus received grants and fellowships to support new and ongoing research projects.

  • Thomas Baumgarte (physics) was awarded a renewal grant from the National Science Foundation for his project titled “RUI: Numerical Simulations of Black Holes, Neutron Stars and Gravitational Radiation.”
  • Rachel Beane (earth and oceanographic studies) was awarded a Visiting Erskine Fellowship from the University of Canterbury in support of her sabbatical research in New Zealand.
  • Deb DeGraff (economics) and her colleagues from the University of Texas were awarded a NIH RO3 grant for their project on “Secondary Analysis of Social and Behavioral Datasets in Aging.”
  • Patsy Dickinson (biology/neuroscience) was awarded a supplement grant to support an undergraduate research fellowship from the National Science Foundation for her project called “RUI: Coordinated modulation of a multilayered neuromuscular system.” Dickinson and Elizabeth Stemmler (chemistry) were also awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for their project called “Collaborative Research: RUI: Molecular mechanisms and physiological triggers underlying neuromodulator plasticity in a lobster pattern generator.”
  • John Fitzgerald and Rachel Connelly (economics) were awarded a grant from the Institutes for Research on Poverty for their project on “The Impact of Food Stamps on Age at Onset of Adverse Health Conditions.”
  • Pamela Fletcher (art history) and her coauthors won the Association of Research Institutes in Art History (ARIAH) 2014 Prize in Online Publishing for an article on the 19th century London art market.
  • Mark Foster (English) was awarded a Fulbright Scholar award to South Africa.
  • Michael Franz (government) and his collaborators from Wesleyan were awarded a grant from
    the MacArthur Foundation for their project The Wesleyan Media Project.
  • William Jackman (biology) was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health AREA
    R15 program for his project on “Cellular analysis of hedgehog signaling in zebra fish tooth
    development.”
  • Michele LaVigne (earth and oceanographic studies) was awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for her project called “RUI: OCE-RIG: Decadal climate, carbon and nutrient variability: New insights from deep-sea bamboo coral records on the California margin.”
  • Steve Naculich (physics) was awarded a renewal grant from the National Science Foundation for his project titled “RUI: Supersymmetric Gauge and String Theory.” Naculich also was awarded a grant from the Simons Foundation Fellows in the Theoretical Physics program to support his project on “Amplitudes in Gauge Theory, Gravity, and String Theory.”
  • Erik Nelson (economics) and his collaborators from the World Wildlife Fund, Florida International University and the University of Washington were awarded a grant from Resources for Our Future for the project on “Assessing the Cost of the Critical Habitat Rule under the Endangered Species Act: A Retrospective Study of Regulatory Performance.
  • Manny Reyes (math) was awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for his project called “RUI: Noncommutative polynomial algebras and the foundations of noncommutative geometry.”
  • Collin Roesler (earth and oceanographic studies) was awarded a grant from NASA for her project on “Quantifying uncertaintites in phytoplankton absorption coefficients for accurate validation of the PACE ocean color sensor: moving towards satellite phytoplankton functional types.” Roesler and her colleagues from the University of Maine were awarded an NSF EPSCoR grant for their project titled “Maine EPSCoR: The Nexus of Coastal Social- Environmental Systems and Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture.” Finally, with her collaborators from public and private institutions in Maine, she received an award from the NSF EPSCoR Program to establish a Sustainable Ecological Aquaculture Network (SEANET) program in Maine. Collin also received a grant from NASA for her project on “Quantifying Uncertainties in Phytoplankton Absorption Coefficients for Accurate Validation of the PACE Ocean Color Sensor: Moving Towards Satellite Retrieved Phytoplankton Functional Types (PFTs).”
  • Andrew Rudalevige (government) was awarded the Martha Joynt Kumar Founders Award for the best paper presented by a Ph.D. holding scholar at the 2013 American Political Science Association meeting.
  • Jennifer Taback (math) was awarded a grant from the Simons Foundation for her project on “Collaboration Grants for Mathematicians: Geometry and quasi-isometry classification of some self-similar groups.”
  • Birgit Tautz and Jill Smith (German) were awarded a grant from the German Embassy to support German Weeks 2014-15.
  • Karen Topp (physics), with collaborators Madeleine Msall (physics) and Charles Dorn (education), received a grant from the Physics Teacher Education Coalition to support the development of a more clearly defined Physics Education path and to encourage students to consider teaching careers.
  • Dharni Vasudevan (chemistry) and her collaborator from the University of Connecticut were awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for their project “Collaborative Research: RUI: Organic Cation Interactions with Soil Aluminosilicates: Structure-Sorption Relationships.”
  • Mary Lou Zeeman (mathematics) and her colleague from the University of Oxford were awarded a grant from the American Institute of Mathematics (AIM) to support their upcoming workshop which will build a conceptual model of the U.S. food system.
  • Leah Zuo (history and Asian studies) was awarded an ACLS Postdoctoral Fellowship for her project, “A New Way of Knowing in the Middle-Period China: Shen Gua (1031-1095) and the Birth of Empiricism.”

Grants for Bowdoin

  • Bowdoin received a major grant from the Elmina B. Sewall Foundation to support Maine fisheries research led by John Lichter, Professor of Biology and Environmental Studies and Program Director for Environmental Studies.
  • The National Institute of Health announced a five-year $18.4 M grant to the Maine IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE), a coalition of Maine colleges, universities, and research institutions in which Bowdoin has been a participant since its inception in 2001. At Bowdoin, the INBRE grant supports a variety of biomedical research opportunities for both students and faculty each year, in addition to helping the College acquire equipment, supplies, and electronic journals to enhance research. Two Bowdoin faculty members have been selected by the INBRE External Advisory Committee as individual investigators leading research projects under the new award: Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Danielle Dube and Associate Professor of Biology and Neuroscience Hadley Horch.
  • The Wallace foundation Special Projects Fund at the New York Community Trust has awarded a grant of $10,000 in support for the Visual Arts Department.
  • The College received a grant from the Morton-Kelly Charitable Trust in support of the Library’s Oliver Otis Howard digitization project.
  • The Bowdoin College Museum of Art received a grant from the Luce Foundation for its Summer 2016 exhibition, This is a Portrait if I Say So: Reimagining Representation in American Art.
thumb: